Anxiety Doesn’t Just Stay In Your Head

Please Share
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Anxiety Doesn’t Just Stay In Your Head, It Affects Your Whole Body

Anxiety doesn’t just stay in your head, it affects every cell in your body,  Of course, that means your GI tract, your neuro pathways, your eyes, your organs and you get the idea. It just doesn’t affect our head. If we want to send anxiety packing, then we need to understand why it came to live with us in the first place.

Even though it is important to understand that anxiety is not just in your head but everywhere else in your body, there are places in your body that you might typically feel that anxiety building up. Some people may feel it more in their chest, felt as a tightening and restriction of their breathing. Others might feel a weird sensation in their neck and shoulders while facing a particularly anxious producing event or oftentimes, people may not even realize their uncomfortableness is due to generalized anxiety. The point is, chronic anxiety is carried throughout your body. It affects your health, physically and emotionally.

Anxiety is felt by men and women, although twice as many women than men. The reason for this partly lies in the fact that the woman’s “fight or flight” response tends to engage quicker than a man’s response and linger around longer, meaning the body doesn’t return to the pre-fight or flight response level as quickly. It is also more prevalent in women because of the effect of estrogen and progesterone.

Anxiety disorders frequently are diagnosed around mid-life, but research suggests that a tendency toward an anxiety response is often suppressed during the busy stages of our life as we are distracted with taking care of the kids or a career, etc. There are other things that contribute, however, to having these feelings of anxiety surface around mid-life.

The woman’s brain chemistry lends itself to more trouble with anxiety. When you add on the hormonal changes during menopause and pre-menopause, the tendency for anxiety and depression increase. Of course, it is about this age that many women and men develop health issues, which only add to the possibility of developing depression or feelings of anxiety.

If you are in your 40’s, 50’s or 60’s, what are some of the changes that you are facing? Besides some health changes for many, the other common ones are job changes, retirement, maybe the concern over retirement without enough money saved, death of a parent or even a spouse or having your kids leave the nest. These can be huge life changes.

Our neurochemical imbalances interfere with mood regulation. These imbalances can occur from the things listed above. Basically from just normal life stresses, specific high emotional events, pollutants, our specific body chemistry and even genetics. That is why it is not always just as easy as popping a pill. It is discovering what is causing anxiety and correcting each thing if possible. If not possible, then learning a healthy way to put it in perspective, so you can enjoy your life’s journey without excessive anxiety.

We can say that anxiety is not all in your head, but everywhere else too, but to help yourself more effectively deal with anxiety, it helps to start with the head. It means taking time to really pinpoint the areas in your life that might be contributing to your anxiety. I am speaking mostly to generalized anxiety. If you have a serious anxiety disorder such as panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobias or a serious generalized anxiety disorder, it would be recommended that you see your primary care provider to evaluate what type of anxiety you are experiencing. That can be important before making a plan of correction to help yourself.

Many people feel embarrassed by their anxiety problems, but you are certainly not alone as their are millions who share your plight. Your basic foundation to health and coping with the daily world involves a good nutrition plan, exercise and adequate sleep. I also feel that including laughter and smiles, even if you don’t feel like it can go a long way in sending the happy chemicals throughout your body, which gives us a better ability to cope.

Starting with a good foundation as mentioned above, you can then start trying to pinpoint what things in your life are causing undue anxiety or why you are reacting with anxiety to some things in your life. This can be enlightening. And while some things might be easy to figure out, some things might be a bit of a puzzle. A counselor may be able to help in this discovery, a good friend or maybe even a good self-help book. At any rate, working on each specific cause can go a long way to helping you feel better. This is not likely an overnight process. It will take some perseverance in most cases.

Getting Your Anxiety Out Of Your Head

It is important to remember that being as positive as possible, which includes encouraging yourself, can help give you confidence and reassurance throughout your day. You just might be helping someone else with their day in the process.

If you have something specific that is causing a great deal of anxiety, it often gets worse and worse if you continue to allow it to dominate your thoughts. Developing a plan specific to that problem can help you feel like you are in control. For example, it could be never feeling like you have enough money at the end of paying all your bills. If you tackle that problem with maybe figuring out all your expenses compared to your income, eliminating something that maybe you don’t really need or just putting things on a comfortable budget plan can help relieve the anxiety for that particular area. Even if you realize that you don’t have enough money to meet barebone expenses, you are tackling the anxiety by working out the problem and you’ll figure out that part of it too. The point is you are actively working on it and this can help decrease anxiety as you work on the specific issue.

I mentioned that a good nutrition program is important, but in addition to that, treating yourself now and then. It could be with a fun snack, but I was thinking of maybe a warm bath or massage. Maybe spending an hour doing something that you really enjoy.

If you have too much free time, you might want to find a fun hobby as opposed to sitting around with nothing to do but worry.

Maybe there is some free classes available in your community or a small Bible study group that help you connect with others.

If you are able, a counselor could be helpful if you need help understanding where your anxiety is coming from or learning new techniques on how you react to the stresses or thoughts that cause you anxiety.


Please Share
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •